The Igloo or Snow House

The Igloo, the Ultimate Green Home

Pavel Gonchar Renoteck News

Although no longer in daily use, the igloo, or snow house, was critical to the survival of the Inuit people. Some Inuit used the igloo during hunting forays or other travel. Other groups used the igloo as their full time winter housing. A  dome made of blocks of snow, they  provided overnight shelter for a solitary hunter or housed 10-20 people in large complexes that linked  smaller igloos.

Occasionally igloos may still be built for temporary shelter while hunting or fishing. The igloo is built from within in a spiral pattern. Snow is used when it can be easily compacted. The only tool required is a knife. With experience, an igloo can be constructed in as little as an hour. Inside an igloo there are 3 levels or tiers. The top level is where the people sleep. The middle level is where the fire is maintained and work is done. The bottom layer is a “cold sump.” The colder air gathers in the sump allowing the upper levels to stay warmer. Because of the air pockets in snow it is a great insulator. The entrance to the igloo, generally at the bottom, would have at least one right angle in it to prevent winds from blowing straight into the igloo. A hole at the top of the igloo allowed for smoke to escape.

Building an Igloo in the Arctic

Building an Igloo in the Arctic

A soapstone lamp in a well built igloo would create a temperature of 0 degrees C. when it was -40 degrees C outside. Body heat would then add to the comfort level, reaching as high as 16 degrees C.

While Renoteck Roofiing may not know how to build igloos, they do know how to provide a roof for the difficult
Alberta conditions. Years of experience, beginning in Calgary, has made Renoteck a company  to be trusted with your roofing needs.

The Final Steps in Building an Igloo

The Final Steps in Building an Igloo